The NaNoWriMo Revision

I am at a loss. I have the beginning of a story or rather a giant yet incomplete chunk of one.

I reached the 50K count last November during National Novel Writing Month with days to spare yet the only thing I can do right now is open the file and look helplessly at the discombobulation of words that were exiting my brain at an average of fifteen hundred words a day. Before the sentence fragments and mish mash of three different story lines take over my soul, I quickly close the file and back away quietly.

What to do, what to do…

I suppose the first thing to do is figure out the structure and work from there.

But how do I do that when one doesn’t exist?

I have found of the main character that works and not coincidentally, is the style of my blog. (What? Sharp and quick-witted yet refreshing and honest? Well, thank you very much…)

The main character Lyla is obviously on a journey in a high fantasy world which is the first time that I have admitted that to myself.

I, lover of all books urban fantasy, YA, and/or YA urban fantasy, am trying my hand at high fantasy.

Whoa.

So Lyla is on a journey obviously.

And therein lies the problem. I have had many false starts that I am unclear of her journey.

I read somewhere that sometimes when you come to a point in your story that is extremely difficult to write or seems forced, then the best thing is to rewind and start over. But if you keep your finger on the rewind button, you never move forward.

Perhaps my life parallels Lyla in that I have no idea where I am going either. Single parenting. Pinching pennies. More moving and shaking so that when I walk less of me is moving and shaking. Wondering what the new normal will be. Counting the minutes until the new normal is in sight.

Perhaps I am unclear of my journey as well.

Oh Lyla, please please please tell me where we are going…

Gotta go. Lyla and I are going to Starbucks.

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One thought on “The NaNoWriMo Revision

  1. The worst part of writing for me was always writing. The best advice I’ve heard is to start the story as close to the main problem as possible, and fill in the backstory in pieces throughout the book. Good luck!

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